Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Discipline and Punish by Michel Foucault



Note: Since Foucault was an interdisciplinary thinker and has had an interdisciplinary impact, we are doing something different with this particular post.  As a result, this post will not be an exclusively philosophical one.  There will be secondary sources posted from other disciplines as well.


Primary Sources:

1) Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Trans. Alan Sheridan. New
York; Random House, 1977. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

2) Rabinow, Paul., ed. The Foucault Reader. New York: Pantheon Books, 1984. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

Note: this book contains selections from Foucault's various primary texts.

Secondary Sources:

Books:

1) Schwan, Anne, and Stephen Shapiro. How to Read Foucault's Discipline and Punish (How to Read Theory). London: PlutoPress, 2011. Print.


2) Rusche, Georg, and Otto Kirchheimer. Punishment and Social Structure (Law and Society). New York: Russell and Russel, 1968. Print. 


3) Armstrong, Timothy J., ed. Michel Foucault, Philosopher. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1992. Print.


Note: this is an anthology with multiple valuable sources discussing Foucault's works and insights.

4) Bidet, Jacques. Foucault with Marx. Trans. Steven Corcoran. London: Zed Books, 2016. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

5) O'Leary, Timothy, and Christopher Falzon. eds. Foucault and Philosophy. Southern Gate: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

Note: This is a collection of essays that cut across various factions of Foucault's thought.

6) Heyes, Cressida J. Self-Transformations: Foucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies. Oxford: Oxford Univerity Press, 2007. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book.

Journal Articles:

1) Alford, Fred C. "What would it matter if everything Foucault said about prison were wrong? Discipline and Punish after twenty years." Theory and Society 29.1 (2000): 125-146. Web.

2) Heilker, Paul. "Discipline and Punish and Process and Paradigms (or Foucault, Visibility, (Dis) Empowerment, and the Construction of Composition Studies." Composition Studies 22.1 (1994): 4-13. Web.

3) Rhodes, Lorna A. "Toward An Anthropology of Prisons." Annual Review of Anthropology 30 (2001): 65-83. Web.

4) Frank, Arthur W. "The politics of the New Positivity: A review Essay of Michel Foucault's "Discipline and Punish." Human Studies 5.1 (1982) 61-67. Web.


Video:

1) This video is by Christina Hendricks of the University of British Colombia.  It is an introduction to "Discipline and Punish."  She does go into the text and discuss certain passages and key ideas; however, the lecture is best suited for those who are beginning their studies of Foucault.



2)  This video is not directly related to "Discipline and Punish."  It is a debate between Noam Chomsky and Michel Foucault.  We have added it here because Foucault touches on a lot of his ideas that are articulated in "Discipline and Punish" as well as elsewhere in his texts.

3) This is a podcast from The Partially Examined Life.  A popular podcast that discusses philosophy.  In this podcast, they examine some of the major themes in "Discipline and Punish."  It is not a scholarly resource.  However, if one was doing research on "Discipline and Punish" and needed to broaden their understanding of it, then this may be a suitable place to do that.

4) This is a lecture by Rick Roderick.  He lectures on Foucault's works and ideas.  Roderick presents this lecture as a kind of overview of Foucault's "Discipline and Punish." Readers of all levels could benefit from this.

5) These two lectures are by Professor John Frow.  He provides and overview of Foucault's work and life.  He also discusses a few works by Foucault including "Discipline and Punish."


Saturday, May 28, 2016

Civilization and Its Discontents By Sigmund Freud

Primary Sources:

1) Freud, Sigmund. Civilization and Its Discontents. Trans. James Strachey. New York: W.W. Norton
& Company, 1961. Print.


2) Freud, Sigmund. Civilization and Its Discontents. Trans. David McLintock. London: Penguin Publishing, 2002. Print.

***Click here to to go Amazon.com to purchase this book

3) Freud, Sigmund. The Freud Reader. Ed. Peter Gay. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1989. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book.

Note: this is a collection of works by Freud which has been compiled together.  Although "Civilization and Its Discontents" are in it, there are also many other relevant works by Feud.  We recommend this to anyone who is looking to study Freud intensely. 

Secondary Sources:

Books:

1) Bauman, Zygmunt. Postmodernity and Its Discontents. New York; New York University Press, 1997. Print.


Note: this book takes Freud's ideas in "Civilization and Its Discontents" and applies them to a postmodern society.

Journal Articles:

1) Shapiro, Barry. "Civilization and Its Discontents." Psychoanalytic Inquiry 32.6 (2012): 559-569. Web.

2) Robert, Paul A. "Civilization and Its Discontents in Anthropological Perspective, Eight Decades On." Psychoanalytic Inquiry 32.6 (2012): 582-595. Web.

3) Zvi, Lothane. "Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents and Related Works: A Reappraisal." Psychoanalytic Inquiry 32.6 (2012): 524-542. Web.

4) Raspa, Richard. Civilization and Its Discontents in the 21st century: Freud, Shakespeare, and Romantic Love." Psychoanalytic Inquiry 32.6 (2012): 596-606. Web.

5) Hollan, Douglas. "Cultures and Their Discontents: On the Cultural Mediation of Shame and Guilt." Psychoanalytic Inquiry 32.6 (2012): 570-581. Web.

6) Young, Allan. "Individualism and Its Discontents." Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 21.4 (2014): 361-362. Web.

7) Capps, Donald, and Carlin, Nathan. "Human Chances for Happiness: A review of Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents." Pastoral Psychology 62.3 (2013): 271-289. Web.

8) Carveth, Donald. "Freud's and Our Paranoid Myth of "The Beast." Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis 20.1 (2012): 153-157. Web.

Video:

1) This lecture is given by Christina Hendricks.  She provides a valuable lecture of what Freud was doing in Civilization and Its Discontents.  People of all levels should find this useful.

2) Valuable introductory lecture by YaleCourses.  It does not examine "Civilization and Its Discontents" in much depth but is valuable for one who is becoming familiar with Freud and his works.


3) This is a philosophy podcast called "The partially examined life."  In this episode, they discuss Freud's "Civilization and Its Discontents" in an introductory manner.  Someone who is beginning their studies in Freud will find this useful.

Friday, May 27, 2016

Human, All Too Human By Friedrich Nietzsche


Our research on this book has left us to believe that there is not a lot of substantial secondary literature on it.  There are quite a few articles and books out there that mention "Human, All Too Human," however, these mentionings are passing thoughts and/or mere lip service.  We do not think it is appropriate to list those sources because they simply do not examine in any kind of depth the ideas contained in this book.  In any event, we have listed what we found.  Hopefully, somebody can come along and point us in the direction of where we can find and review other secondary sources that do more than give it a passing glance.


Primary Sources:
1) Nietzsche, Friedrich. Human, All Too Human. Trans. R.J. Hollingdale. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Print.


2) Nietzsche, Friedrich. Human, Human Too Human. Trans. Marion Faber and Stephen Lehmann. Lincoln: University of Nebraska, Print. 

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

Note: We highly recommend reading the section of this book titled "Beginning to Be Nietzsche" by
Arthur Danto because he explains how Nietzsche became a philosopher while writing "Human, All Too Human."

3) Nietzsche, Friedrich. "Human, All Too Human." Trans. Alexander Harvey. Project Gutenberg. Charles H. Kerr & Company, 1908. Web.

***Click here to go to Project Gutenberg for a free copy of this book


Secondary Sources:

Books:

1) Franco, Paul. Nietzsche's Enlightenment: The Free-Spirit Trilogy of the Middle Period. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. Print.


Journal Articles:

1) Schacht, Richard. "Nietzsche's Naturalism." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43.2 (2012): 185-212. Web.

***This article is not exclusively about "Human, All Too Human; however, it does discuss how Nietzsche conceived of himself as a naturalistic thinker which takes up a large part of "Human, All Too Human."

2) Fanco, Paul. "Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human and the Problem of Culture." The Review of Politics 69 (2007): 215-243. Web.

3) Elgat, Guy. "Nietzsche's Critique of Pure Altruism -- Developing an Argument from Human, All Too Human." Inquiry 58.3 (2015): 308-326. Web.

Video:

1) Human, All Too Human: BBC Documentary.  This is a documentary about Nietzsche's life.  It is not a scholarly examination of the book.  However, because the video bears the same name as the book, we thought we would include it.


Thursday, May 26, 2016

Metaphysics By Aristotle

Primary Sources:

1) Aristotle. Metaphysics. Trans. Joe Sachs. Santa Fe: Green Lion Press, 1999. Print.



2) Aristotle. "Metaphysics." Greek Philosophy Thales to Aristotle. Ed. Reginald E. Allen. New York: The Free Press, 1991. 307-383. Print.


Note: This book is an anthology.  It does not have the "Metaphysics" in its entirety.  However, this book is an excellent resource for introductory purposes.

3) Aristotle. Metaphysics. Trans. Richard Hope. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1960. Print.


4) Aristotle. Metaphysics. Trans. Hugh Lawson-Tancred. London: Penguin Group, 1999. Print.

***Click to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

5) LibriVox has an audiobook of Aristotle's "Metaphysics," which can be found by following the link directly below:

***Click here to go to LibriVox for a free audio recording of Aristotle's Metaphysics

Note: the content on LibriVox is in the public domain in the USA.  Check you local laws before downloading.

Secondary Sources:

Books:

1) Anagnostopoulos, Georgios., ed. A Companion to Aristotle. Malden: Blackwell Publishing, 2013. Print.


Note: This is an anthology.  It is not entirely dedicated to Aristotle's "Metaphysics."  Part III of the book is dedicated to Aristotle's theoretical knowledge, which includes 7 essays dedicated to examining Aristotle's "Metaphysics."  The reason we cite the entire book is because it a valuable resource for research on all things Aristotle.

2)  Barnes, Jonathan., ed. The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Print.


Note: This is also an anthology.  It is not dedicated entirely to Aristotle's "Metaphysics."  Pages 66-108 are dedicated to discussing it, however.  Despite it not being entirely dedicated to Aristotle's "Metaphysics," it is still a valuable resource for conducting research.

3) Politis, Vasilis. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle and the Metaphysics. London: Routledge, 2004. Print.


We usually list valuable and relevant journal articles and other books at this point.  However, the Stanford Encyclopedia has already put together an extensive compilation of primary and secondary sources specifically for Aristotle's "Metaphysics."  So, we highly recommend anybody doing research on Aristotle's "Metaphysics" to go HERE (link takes you to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy SEP) to get a bird's eye view of the literature.  The sources herein, primary and secondary, are enough to get one started but the SEP should not be avoided.


Video:

1) These two videos are by Dr. Arthur F. Holmes of Wheaton College.  The lectures are good for beginners and intermediate level students.  Undergraduates and graduate students will find these useful.  They are, however, probably not best suited for those who already have a substantial background in this field.  Nonetheless, they are valuable resources for research.





2) Dr. Sadler provides an introduction to Aristotle's "Metaphysics."  This is a purely introductory lecture.  A very good lecture but focused on familiarizing beginners with "Metaphysics."



3) These two videos are also by Dr. Sadler and they are also focused on providing beginners with an introduction to Aristotle's "Metaphysics."  As a matter of fact, these two videos only cover Book 1 in the "Metaphysics."  These videos, however, are valuable for doing research.   






Wednesday, May 25, 2016

The Phenomenology of Spirit by G.W.F. Hegel


Primary Sources:

1) Hegel, G.W.F. Phenomenology of Spirit. Trans. A.V. Miller. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1977. Print.


2) Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich. "Hegel's Philosophy of Mind." Project Gutenberg. Clarendon Press, 2012. Web.


Note: We usually try and list several translations of a primary work in case people want to compare and contrast.  However, in the case of Hegel's "Phenomenology," the Miller translation has become the translation par excellence in academia.  So, we only list  that along with a free version supplied by Project Gutenberg.

Secondary Sources:

Books:

1) Priest, Stephen., ed. Hegel's Critique of Kant. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987. Print.


Note: This book is an anthology.  Though all of the essays contained therein are not exclusively about Hegel's "Phenomenology," they are all relevant to it.

2) Stern, Robert. The Routledge Guidebook To Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. New York: Routledge. Print.


3) Macdonald, Molly. Hegel and Psychoanalysis: A New Interpretation of "Phenomenology of Spirit." New York: Routledge, 2014. Print.


4) Westphal, Kenneth R., ed. The Blackwell Guide to Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Malden: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. Print.


Journal Articles:

1) Solomon, Robert C. "A Small Problem in Hegel's Phenomenology." Journal of the History of Philosophy 13.3 (1975): 399-400. Web.

2) Browman, Brady. "Spinozist Pantheism and the Truth of "Sense Certainty":What the Eleusinian Mysteries Tell us about Hegel's Phenomenology." Journal of the History of Philosophy 50.1 (2012): 85-110. Web.

3) Dorrien, Gary. "In The Spirit of Hegel: Post-Kantian Subjectivity, the Phenomenology of Spirit, and Absolute Idealism." American Journal of Theology & Philosophy 33.3 (2012): 220-223. Web.

4) LaMothe, Kimmerer L. "Reason, Religion, and Sexual Difference; Resources for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit." Hypatia 21.1 (2005): 120-149.

5) Okrent, Mark. Consciousness and Objective Spirit in Hegel's Phenomenology." Journal of the History of Philosophy 18.1 (1980): 39-55.

6) Bayer, Thora I. "Hegelian Rhetoric." Philosophy and Rhetoric 42.3 (2009): 203-219. Web.

7) Mueller, Gustav E. "The Hegel Legend of "Thesis-Antithesis-Synthesis." Journal of the History of Ideas 19.3 (1958): 411-415. Web.

**This is an old article (1958) but is useful to overcome the reduction of Hegel's thought to the often cited thesis, antithesis, synthesis schematism.  It explains Hegel's method of dialectic which Hegel uses in the "Phenomenology."

8) Williams, Robert R. "Hegel and Transcendental Philosophy." The Journal of Philosophy 82.11 (1985): 595-606. Web.

***This is also an older article.  It examines some of the arguments for and against  Hegel's "Phenomenology" as transcendental philosophy.

9) Winfield. Richard D. "Is Phenomenology Necessary as Introduction to Philosophy?" The Review of Metaphysics 65.2 (2011): 279-298. Web.

10) Westphal, Kenneth R. "Hegel's Manifold Response to Scepticism in The Phenomenology of Spirt." Proceedings of the Aristotelean Society 103 (2003): 149-178. Web. 

Video:

1) Dr. Sadler goes through the "Phenomenology of Spirit," section by section, offering a thorough analysis of the material.  This is a major contribution to the philosophical community.  Anyone interested in doing research on Hegel should take advantage of these videos.

***Click here to go to Dr. Sadler's blog where his full lecture series on the "Phenomenology of Spirit" can be found



2) Dr. Sadler also gives a single lecture on Hegel's "Phenomenology."  Obviously, this will not be as in depth as the previous ones.  However, they provide a sufficient introduction to the "Phenomenology."

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

The Critique of Pure Reason By Immanuel Kant

Primary Sources:

1) Kant, Immanuel. Critique of Pure Reason. Trans. Paul Guyer and Allen W. Wood. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Print.


2) Kant, Immanuel. "Critique of Pure Reason." Basic Writing of Kant. Ed. Allen W. Wood. New York: Random House Publishing, 2001. 1-115. Print. 



***The audio books on LibriVox are in the public domain in the USA.  Check your local laws before downloading, if outside the USA.

4) Kant, Immanuel. "The Critique of Pure Reason." Trans. J.M.D. Meiklejohn. Project Gutenberg, 2003. Web.

***Click here to go to a free copy of this book provided by Project Gutenberg.

Secondary Sources:

Books:

1) Gardner, Sebastian. Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason. London: Routledge, 1999. Print.


2) Guyer, Paul., ed.  The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book.

3) Allison, Henry E. Kant's Transcendental Idealism: An Interpretation and Defense. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book.

4) Bird, Graham. The Revolutionary Kant: A Commentary on the Critique of Pure Reason. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 2006. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book.

5) Smith, Norman K. "A Commentary to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason." Project Gutenberg, 2013. Web.

***Click here to find a free copy of this book provided by Project Gutenberg.

6) Guyer, Paul. Kant and the Claims of Knowledge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

Journal Articles:

1) Moller, Sofie C. "The Court of Reason in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason." Kant-Studien 104.3 (2013): 301-320. Web.

2) Werkmeister, W. H. "The Critique of Pure reason and Physics." Kant-Studien 68.1-4 (2009): 33-45. Web. 

3) Janiak, Andrew. "Kant's Views on Space and Time." Standford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Standford Encylopedia of Philosophy, 2012. Web.

***Click here to go to this SEP article

4) Williams, Garrath. "Kant's Account of Reason." Standford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Standford Encylopedia of Philosophy, 2016. Web.

***Click here to go to this SEP article

Note that this article discusses theoretical reason as well as practical reason.  However, the discussion of the two is substantive and contributes to a thorough comprehension of reason in the "Critique of Pure Reason."

5) Pereboom, Derk. "Kant's Transcendental Arguments."  Standford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Standford Encylopedia of Philosophy, 2014. Web.

***Click here to go to this SEP article

6) Grier, Michelle. "Kant on The Illusion of a Systematic Unity of Knowledge." History of Philosophy Quarterly 14.1 (1997): 1-28. Web.

7) McLear, Colin. "Kant: Philosophy of Mind." Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy,

8) Engstrom, Stephen. "Unity of Apperception." Studi Kantiani 26 (2013): 37-54. Web.

Video:

1) This lecture series is given by Professor Dan Robinson of Oxford University.  This a thorough examination of Kant's first critique.  It is suited for anybody, beginner through professional, that has an interest in Kant's first critique.  Please note that we provide a link to these videos below instead of posting the video in this blog.  We did this to save space as the series is eight videos long.

Click here to go to the lecture series


2) A two-part lecture series provided by Professor Richard Brown.  This is an introduction to Kant's first critique.  




3) Another introductory lecture series that sufficiently hits on the key themes in Kant's first critique.  Any novice looking to get into Kant's first critique should find these useful.  Please note that this lecture series is not as scholarly as some others.  However, the lecturer is clear and concise with his points, which makes the series valuable for the beginner.  

Click here to go to the lecture series



Note: This list is by no means exhaustive.  We are always in the process of continuously updating this post.  However, if one were looking to study Kant's first critique, then the sources provided in this post would be sufficient in order to understand what is going on in the first critique as well as write an undergraduate or graduate level research paper (with the exception of a Ph.D. dissertation).  

Monday, May 23, 2016

The Communist Manifesto By Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels


Primary Sources:

***A note must be made here before listing sources.  There is a website https://www.marxists.org/ where an extensive collection of Marx's and Engels' works can be found.  The works contained therein are allowed to be freely distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution -- ShareAlike License.  This license is valid in the U.S.A.  Because of this, we are permitted to post direct links to the works.  However, we still provide proper MLA citation for pedagogical purposes.

1) Marx, Karl, and Engles, Friedrich. "Manifesto of the Communist Party." Marx and Engles Selected Works Vol. 1. Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1969. 98- 137. Print.

1a) Marx, Karl, and Engles, Friedrich. "Manifesto of the Communist Party." Marxists.org. Progress Publishers, 1969. Web.

***Note that this book can be downloaded as a PDF as well as other mediums for consumption by following the link: Click here to go to the Manifesto

2) Marx, Karl. "The Communist Manifesto." Karl Marx: Selected Writings 2nd Edition. Ed. David McLellan. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. 24-270. Print.

3) An audio reading of this book in the LibriVox database can be found by clicking this link

***LibraVox recordings are in the public domain in the USA.  If you live outside of the USA, check with your local laws before downloading.

Secondary Sources:

Books:

1) Hunt, Richard N. The Political Ideas of Marx and Engels. London: Macmillan, 1975. Print.


Journal Articles:

1) Weeks, Kathi. "The Critical Manifesto: Marx and Engels, Haraway, and Utopian Politics." Utopian Studies 24.2 (2013): 216-231. Web.

2) Boyer, George R. "The Historical Background of the Communist Manifesto." Journal of Economic Perspectives 12.4 (1998): 151-174. 

3) Cunliffe, John.  "Marx's Politics: The Tensions in the Communist Manifesto." Political Studies 30.4 (1982): 569-574. Web.

4) Levin, Michael. "Deutschmarx: Marx, Engels, and the German Question." Political Studies 29.4 (1981): 497-463. Web.  

Video:

1) A talk given by Terry Eagleton on "The Communist Manifesto" can be found by clicking on this link

***While Easgleton is not a philosopher but a literary critic, he nevertheless provides an entertaining discussion on the Manifesto.  It is worth watching for gaining general knowledge about what the Manifesto is doing.  However, this video is not going to provide an in-depth philosophical examination of the Manifesto.

Saturday, May 21, 2016

The Will to Power By Friedrich Nietzsche

Primary Sources:


1) Nietzsche, Friedrich. The Will to Power. Trans. Anthony M. Ludovici. New York: Barnes and Nobel Inc, 2006. Print. 


2) Nietzsche, Friedrich. The Will to Power. Trans. Walter Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale. New York: Vintage Books, 1968. Print.

Secondary Sources:

Print:

1) Soll, Ivan. "Nietzsche's Will to Power as a Psychological Thesis: Reactions to Bernard Reginster." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43.1 (2012): 118-129  Web.

***This article is a reaction to a book written by Bernard Reginster.  See the citation directly below for this book.

2) Reginster, Bernard. The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on Overcoming Nihilism. Cambridge: Harvard Univeristy Press, 2006. Print


3) Katsafanas, Paul. "Philosophical Psychology as a Basis for Ethics." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44.2 (2013): 297-314. Web.

***This article examines how the will to power thesis has a normative status as the foundation for ethics.

4) Aydin, Ciano. "Nietzsche on Reality as Will to Power: Toward an "Organization-Struggle" Model." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 33 (2007): 25-48. Web.

***The author says the "goal of this article is to shed light on Nietzsche's notion of reality through a critical examination of the notions "will to power," "struggle," and "organization" (Aydin 25).

5) Rydenfelt, Henrik. "Valuation and the Will to Power: Nietzsche's Ethics with Ontology." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44.2 (2013): 213-224. Web.

***The author says the goal of the essay "is to sketch and defend an interpretation of Nietzsche’s ethical views that would—to the extent that it is possible—incorporate both the antirealistic or nihilistic aspects of his metaethics and the “positive” ethical valuations undeniably present in his writings" (Rydenfelt 213).

6) Soll, Ivan. "Nietzsche Disempowered: Reading the Will to Power out of Nietzsche's Philosophy." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46.3 (2015): 425-450. Web.

***The author says this is to "confront and criticize the widespread tendency to ignore, marginalize, or dismiss without serious consideration Nietzsche’s psychological hypothesis that a “will to power” is the major motivator of human behavior" (Soll 425).  

7) Reginster, Bernard. "Replies to My Critics." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43.1 (2012):130-143. Web.

***Reginster defends his position of his account of Nietzsche's Will to Power thesis in his (Reginster's) book "The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on Overcoming Nihilism," which is cited above.  He specifically is replying to Soll's objections levied in "Nietzsche's Will to Power as a Psychological Thesis: Reactions to Bernard Reginster," which is also cited above.  

8)  Emden, Christian J. "Nietzsche's Will to Power: Biology, Naturalism, and Normativity." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47.1 (2016): 30-60. Web.

*** The thesis the author defends in this paper can be stated in his own words as such: "The link between the will to power and normativity cannot be explained, however, along the lines of a psychological reading of Nietzsche’s naturalism; rather, Nietzsche’s naturalism is rooted in contemporary biological discussions. Biology comes first, psychology second" (Emden 30).

9) Rehberg, Andrea. "The Overcoming of Physiology." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 23 (2002): 39-50. Web.

***The author makes an argument about why she thinks physiology and the will to power thesis are synonymous with another.  Any distinction between the two "is a matter of emphasis rather than due to a strong conceptual separation" (Rehberg 39).














Friday, May 20, 2016

The World as Will and Representation by Arthur Schopenhauer

Since Schopenhauer intended readers to be familiar with his dissertation (On the fourfold root of the principle of sufficient reason) while reading his magnum opus (the world as will and representation), we have included both of the works in this post.  We have included the secondary sources on both of the primary sources in this post as well because often times authors address Schopenhauer's works together either implicitly or explicitly.








Primary Sources for "The World as Will and Representation":






1) Schopenhauer, Arthur. The World as Will and Representation Volume 1. Trans. E. F. J. Payne. New York: Dover Publications Inc, 1969. Print.



2) Schopenhauer, Arthur. The World as Will and Representation Volume 2. Trans. E. F. J. Payne. New York: Dover Publications Inc, 1969. Print.



3) Schopenhauer, Arthur. The world as Will and Representation Volume 1. Trans. Judith Norman and Alistair Welchman and Christopher Janaway. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Print.


For those who are unfamiliar with Project Gutenberg, it is a resource where over 52,000 free ebooks can be viewed and read in their entirety.  Since the works contained within Project Gutenberg are not protected under U.S. copyright law, we are allowed to distribute links directly to the published material.  However, we still cite the works appropriately for pedagogical purposes.

1) Schopenhauer, Arthur. The World as Will and Idea Volume 1. Trans. R.B. Haldane and J. Kemp. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co, (1909).


2) Schopenhauer, Arthur. The World as Will and Idea Volume 2. Trans. R,B. Haldane and J. Kemp. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co, (1909). 


3) Schopenhauer, Arthur. The World as Will and Idea Volume 3. Trans. R,B. Haldane and J. Kemp. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co, (1909). 

***Click here to go to a PDF version of this work


Primary Sources for "On the Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason."

1) 1) Schopenhauer, Arthur. On the Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason and Other Writings. Trans. David E. Cartwright, Edward E. Erdmann, and Christopher Janaway. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Print.


Note: There are other translations of this work out there which is confirmed by a simple Amazon search.  However, this particular compilation of translations is the most accessible of them all. Accessible meaning that the language of the translations has been updated for contemporary readers. Thus, we only list this set of translations for the foregoing reason.


Secondary Sources:

Books:

1) Wicks, Robert L. Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation: A Reader's Guide. London: Continuum Internation Publishing Group, 2011. Print.

2) Young Julian. Willing and Unwilling: A Study in the Philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer. Dordrecht: Springer, 1987. Print.

3) Magee, Bryan. The Philosophy of Schopenhauer. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997. Print.
***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

4) Atwell, John E. Schopenhauer on the Character of the World: The Metaphysics of Will. Berkely: University of California Press, 1995. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

5) Copleston, Frederick C. Copleston, Frederick C. Arthur Schopenhauer: Philosopher of Pessimism. London: Burns Oates and Washbourne, 1946. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

6) Gardiner, P. Schopenhauer. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1963. Print.
***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

7) Hamlyn, D. W. Schopenhauer. London: Routledge, 1980. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book


8) Janaway, Christopher. Self and World in Schopenhauer’s Philosophy. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989. Print.

***Click here to go to Amazon.com to purchase this book

9) Tanner, Michael. Schopenhauer. London: Phoenix, 1998. Print.

***Click here to to to Amazon.com to purchase this book


Journal Articles:

1) Snow, Dale E., and Snow, James J. "Was Schopenhauer an Idealist?" Journal of the History of Philosophy 29.4 (1991): 633-655. Web.

2) Ryan, Christopher. "Schopenhauer on Idealism, Indian and European." Philosophy East and West 65.1 (2015): 18-35. Web.

3) Humphrey, Ted. "Schopenhauer and the Cartesian Tradition." Journal of the History of Philosophy 19.2 (1981): 191-212. Web.

4) McDermid, D. "Schopenhauer as Epistemologist: a Kantian Against Kant." International Philosophical Quarterly  42.2 (2002): 209–29. Web.

5) Safranski, R. Schopenhauer and The Wild Years of Philosophy. Trans. E. Osers. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990. Print.

6) Snow, D. and Snow J. (1991) "Was Schopenhauer an Idealist." Journal of the History of Philosophy 29.1 (1991): 633–55. Web.

7) Ko├čler, Matthias. "Life is but a Mirror: On the Connection between Ethics, Metaphysics and Character in Schopenhauer. European Journal of Philosophy 16.2 (2008): 230-250. Web.

8) Cabos, Jordi. "Schopenhauer and the malaise of an age." Philosophy and Social Criticism 42.1 (2016): 93-113. Web.

9) Migotti, Mark. "Schopenhauer's Pessimism and the Unconditioned Good." Journal of the History of Philosophy 33.4 (1995): 643-660. Web.

10) Luchte, James. "The Body of Sublime Knowledge: The Aesthetic Phenomenology of Arthur Schopenhauer. Heythrop Journal 50.2 (2009): 228-242. Web.

11) Vandenabeele, Bart. "Schopenhauer on Aesthetic Understanding and the Values of Art." European Journal of Philosophy 16.2 (2008): 194-210. Web.

12) Lewis, Peter B. "Schopenhauer's Laughter." Monist 88.1 (2005): 36-51. Web.

13) McDermind, Douglas J. "The World as Representation: Schopenhauer's Argument for Transcendental Idealism." British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11.1 (2003): 57-87. Web.


Video:

1) Bryan Magee and Frederick Copleston discuss Schopenhauer's philosophy.  The first half of this video is dedicated to explaining Schopenhauer's metaphysics and relationship to Kant.  This is helpful in order to wrap one's mind around what Schopenhauer is doing in The World as Will and Representation.  The latter half is dedicated to Schopenhauer's moral views and his influence on other thinkers.



2) This video by the School of Life is an overview of Schopenhauer's life and philosophy as presented in the "World as Will and Representation."  It does not go into much depth but suffices as a brief introduction for anyone not familiar with Schopenhauer.



3) This video was made by the Academy of Ideas.  It does a good job situating Schopenhauer's philosophy in its historical context as well as articulating the majority themes in his philosophy.



4) A satisfactory introduction to Schopenhauer's dissertation.


5) A satisfactory introduction to Schopenhauer's introduction to the "World as Will..."



6) Excellent overview of Schopenhauer's life and philosophy by Will Durrant.


7) These three videos are also excellent overviews of Schopenhauer's life and philosophy.  They are in German, however.







Thursday, May 19, 2016

Stephen James Bartlett

The articles cited in this post are by the philosopher Stephen James Bartlett.  There are three articles and they all in some way address the personal side of philosophical discourse.  The articles examine philosopher's relationship with themselves as well as relationships with other philosophers.  Though they do not posit a philosophical theory or explore any canonized philosophical works, they are interesting pieces about one scholar's perspective on the political state of academic philosophy.  They are highly recommended for anyone interested in learning about some of the political dynamics professional academic philosophers struggle with both within themselves and their own philosophies as well as their relationships to other philosophers and other philosophies.  They are helpful for making arguments when attempting to psychologize any philosopher and their work.

Because these articles have been approved for distribution under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial No Derivs license, I can provide direct links to these articles.  However, I still provide the appropriate MLA citation followed by a link to the article.

1) Bartlett, Stephen J. "Philosophy As Ideology." Metaphilosophy 17.1 (1986): 1-13. Web.  The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com

***The article can be found by clicking this link

2) Bartlett, Stephen J. "Narcissism And Philosophy." Methodology and Science: Interdisciplinary Journal for the Empirical Study of the Foundations of Science 19.1 (1986): 16-26. Web. The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com

***The article can be found by clicking this link

3) Bartlett, Stephen J. "Psychological Underpinnings of Philosophy." Metaphilosophy 20.3 (1989): 295-305. Web.  The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com

***The article can be found by clicking this link

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

On The Genealogy of Morals By Friedrich Nietzsche



Primary Print Sources*:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNyVWFMdJgoSIt4NGavvSkQ1) Nietzsche, Friedrich.  On The Genealogy of Morals. Trans. Walter Kaufmann and RJ Hollingdale.  New York: Vintage-Random House, 1967. Print.  Original publish date 1887.


2) Nietzsche, Friedrich.  "On The Genealogy of Morals." Basic Writings of Nietzsche. Ed. Walter Kaufmann. New York: Random House, 1967. 437-599. Print.  Original publish date 1887

3) Nietzsche, Friedrich. On The Genealogy of Morality. 2nd ed. Trans. Carol Diethe.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Original publish date 1887.

Secondary Video Sources:

1) Raymond Geuss Lecturing on Nietzsche's Genealogy: Click here to find the playlist for Prof. Geuss' lectures  

Lecture #1 is dedicated to historically situating Nietzsche and his project in the Genealogy.

Lecture #2 continues historical discussion and talks about the kind of thinking Nietzsche applies in the Genealogy.

Lecture #3 talks about Nietzsche's approach to morality.  Discusses "mythical" thinking vs. conceptual and abstract thinking.  Also, begins talking about master and slave morality.

Lecture #4 is dedicated to examining the first essay in the Genealogy.  Topics include, but are not limited to, master and slave morality and the slave revolt in morality.

Lecture #5 reviews some important ideas discussed in the first essay and begins an examination of the second essay in the Genealogy.  Topics covered include, but are not limited to, bad conscience, good conscience, promise making, memory, forgetfulness, moral responsibility, the internalization of pain, creditor and debtor.

Lecture #6 reviews material from previous lecture.  Moves into an examination of the third essay in the Genealogy.  Topics include, but are not limited to, ascetic practices, ascetic ideals, combining the first and second essays, priests and the attempt to alleviate the slaves' suffering.

Lecture #7 thoroughly reviews material from previous lecture.  Continues examination of the third essay. Topics include, but are not limited to, Christianity, asceticism, the relationship between the priests and slaves, nihilism, will to truth, and truth-telling.

Review: Overall this 7 part lecture is useful for broadly understanding the main themes and story in the Genealogy, as well as being introduced to the major concepts. The lecturer does not refer to the Genealogy throughout the lecture; however, this is probably because he assumes the students have already read the material. The professor is animated and passionate which helps keep the listener/viewer engaged.  This series is for anybody looking to begin a study of the Genealogy or looking to expand or shore up their understanding of the Genealogy.

2) Gregory B. Sadler Lecturing on Nietzsche's Genealogy: Click here to find the playlist for Prof. Sadler's lectures

Lecture #1 examines the first essay in the Genealogy.  Topics include, but are not limited to, the noble class, the priestly class, ressentiment, nihilism.

Lecture#2 examines the second essay in the Genealogy.  Topics covered include, but are not limited to, will to power, punishment, bad conscience, promise making, suffering, creditor and debtor.

Lecture #3 reviews materials from the previous lecture and begins an examination of the third essay in the Genealogy.  Topics include, but are not limited to, the ascetic ideal, asceticism, philosophers and scholars, the noble class, the priestly class, the herd.

Lecture #4 continues examining the third essay in the Genealogy.  Topics include, but are not limited to, what the ascetic priests do for the slave class, asceticism, ressentiment, Nietzsche's genealogical method, and conclusory remarks about the Genealogy.  

Review:  The lecturer relies heavily on Nietzsche's text often quoting passages at length and then following up with an analysis. This method is beneficial for providing textual context for the subsequent analysis of key ideas pulled from the quoted text.  Persons ranging from the novice to the more advanced may find this series beneficial, in that, it is a good introduction to Nietzsche's Genealogy in breadth without sacrificing depth, which the more advanced reader might appreciate. The lecturer does speak slowly which the novice reader may appreciate.  However, a more advanced reader may benefit from speeding up the video in order to move through more quickly.

3) Gregory B. Sadler Lecturing on Ethics and Nietzsche's Genealogy: Click here to find Prof. Sadler's lecture

Review: This single lecture, which runs about 52:28, includes, but is not limited to, examining the following topics in Nietzsche's Genealogy: might makes right, master and slave morality, the slave revolt in morality, and ressentiment.  This particular lecture is not for the advanced or intermediate reader of Nietzsche's Genealogy.  This lecture is aimed more toward a very limited and novice introduction to the Genealogy.  Thus, if one has little to no familiarity with the Genealogy, then this lecture is a good place to start.  However, the intermediate to advanced reader of the Genealogy may not find this useful.

Secondary Print Sources:

Books:

1) Schacht, Richard, ed. Nietzsche, Genealogy, Morality.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.  Print.



2) Ridely, Aaron. Nietzsche's Conscience: Six Character Studies from the Genealogy. Ithica: Cornell University Press, 1998. Print.


3)  Wallace, Jay.  "Ressentiment, Value, Self-Vindication: Making Sense of Nietzsche's Slave Revolt." Nietzsche and Morality. Ed. Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu.  Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. 110-137. Print.
1)  Ridely, Aaron. "Guilt Before God, Or God Before Guilt?  The Second Essay of Nietzsche's Genealogy."  The Journal of Nietzsche Studies  29 (2005): 35-45. Project Muse. Web.
2)  Risse, Mathias.  "On god and guilt: A reply to Aaron Ridley."  The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 29 (2005): 46-53. Project Muse. Web.
3)  Risse, Mathias. "The Second Treatise in on the Genealogy of Morality: Nietzsche on the Origin of the Bad Conscious." European Journal of Philosophy 9.1 (2001): 55-81. Project Muse. Web.

4) Owen, David. "The Contest of Enlightenment: An Essay on Critique and Genealogy." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (2003): 35-57. Project Muse. Web.

5)  Loeb, Paul S. "Finding the Ubermench in Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 30 (2005): 70-101. Web.

6)  Hatab, Lawernce J. "How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche's Genealogy?" The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 35/36 (2008): 106-123. Project Muse. Web.

7)  Owen, David. "Nietzsche's Genealogy Revisited." The Journal of Nietzsche Studies 35/36 (2008): 141-154. Project Muse.Web.
























*All sources are in English and cited in MLA format.  If you would like to see a different format, just ask or see: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/